Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

Post Tagged with: "Secessionism"

  • [Article] Ups and Downs: Optimism, Banking, and Secession

    [Article] Ups and Downs: Optimism, Banking, and Secession

    People are happier even as bank creation reaches zero and legislators of one U.S. state noodle how they might approach secession.

     
  • [Press] Are the Seeds Already Sown For Another Civil War?

    [Press] Are the Seeds Already Sown For Another Civil War?

    On the east coast, the State Commander of the League of the South says, “The United States is not a country. The empire is over. It’s just a matter of time” (Canada, April 11, 2011).

     
  • Negative Social Mood Soon To Foster Secessionist Sentiment in the U.S.

    Negative Social Mood Soon To Foster Secessionist Sentiment in the U.S.

    GAINESVILLE, Ga. / March 8, 2010 – A study of secessionist activity during the United States’ 234-year history reveals that the country’s pent-up anger during negative mood periods is like the pent-up energy prior to an earthquake – it will find violent release.

     
  • U.S. Secessionist Sentiment is on the Rise – Will your State Revolt?

    U.S. Secessionist Sentiment is on the Rise – Will your State Revolt?

    Secession isn’t relegated to the history book; it’s a powerful modern political force and springs from the bear-market impulse to polarize and separate. Declines in social mood chip away at the foundations of authority, eventually pushing citizens to attack their own government. In this report, Alan Hall compiles the first-ever index of U.S. secessionism movements to show how, when and why a people revolt.

     
  • [Article] The Developing European Tinderbox: The EU Appears Set to Go Up in Flames

    [Article] The Developing European Tinderbox: The EU Appears Set to Go Up in Flames

    Brian Whitmer, editor of Elliott Wave International’s European Financial Forecast, teams up with The Socionomist to deliver an arresting account of the social climate in Europe and shows how negative social mood is driving apart the economies and politics of the European Union. His analysis shows compelling socionomic parallels between early America and modern Europe, warning of the largest threat to European solidarity since World War II.