Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

Post Tagged with: "Economy"

  • [Article] The Mainstream Reports On the Financial/Economic Dichotomy

    [Article] The Mainstream Reports On the Financial/Economic Dichotomy

    “Financial markets do not operate in the same way as those for other goods and services. When the price of a television set or software package goes up, demand for it generally falls. When the price of a financial asset rises, demand generally increases.”
    —The Economist, August 12, 2010

     
  • [Article] Social Mood Shapes Aggregate Opinion Regardless of Data

    [Article] Social Mood Shapes Aggregate Opinion Regardless of Data

    One way to identify the effects of inflation and deflation is to observe significant changes in the money supply and in producer and consumer prices. One would think that as such measures rise, experts would be concerned about increasing inflation, and as those measures fall, they might begin to fear deflation. Is that what actually happens?

     
  • [Article] Sociometrics: Applying Socionomic Causality to Social Forecasting

    [Article] Sociometrics: Applying Socionomic Causality to Social Forecasting

    The underlying idea of causality that the Standard Social Science Model simplistically borrows from physics that external social actions cause reactive changes in social mood is inappropriate for understanding the genesis of financial market action.

     
  • [Article] Predicting Economic and Monetary Trends

    [Article] Predicting Economic and Monetary Trends

    How does one apply socionomic techniques to economic forecasting? A socionomist knows that the stock market is a meter of social mood, which is the engine of social progress and regress. Therefore, the current-time change in the stock market is an immensely useful indicator of upcoming economic change.

     
  • [Article] A Socionomic View of Central Bank Causality

    [Article] A Socionomic View of Central Bank Causality

    Both supporters and critics of the Federal Reserve System agree that the first cause of paper money inflation and credit expansion in the U.S. since 1913 is the Fed. How does a socionomist respond to this assertion?

     
  • [Article] Toward a New Understanding of Growth and Recession, Boom and Depression

    [Article] Toward a New Understanding of Growth and Recession, Boom and Depression

    Since the Great Depression, we have had immense improvements in science and technology. Given seven additional decades of data collection and progress in econometric techniques, one might presume that the forecasting tools of macroeconomics have become vastly more effective than their predecessors of 1929. Yet as recently as 1988, some leading economists went on the record about the profession’s lack of progress.

     
  • [Article] Did a Break in the Big Brands Signal a Decline in Social Mood?

    [Article] Did a Break in the Big Brands Signal a Decline in Social Mood?

    Can a basket of equities backed by a broad cross-section of commercial fantasy images developed over the course of a bull market reflect the end of that bull market ahead of other major indexes?