Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

Socionomic Theory

  • [Article] Einstein and Social Behavior

    [Article] Einstein and Social Behavior

    Pete Kendall explores the socionomic forces that shaped the life and career of one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th century.   Einstein and the Study of “Psycho-Pathology” If there really is such a thing as social mood that guides collective human experience, how come they don’t teach it […]

     
  • [Article] Israel and Hezbollah

    [Article] Israel and Hezbollah

    In truth, wars in the Middle East DO NOT move the stock market. Every single day includes “good” and “bad” news of some sort, and it’s easy to retrofit that news to an up or down close in the Dow.

     
  • [Article] Sociometrics: Applying Socionomic Causality to Social Forecasting

    [Article] Sociometrics: Applying Socionomic Causality to Social Forecasting

    The underlying idea of causality that the Standard Social Science Model simplistically borrows from physics that external social actions cause reactive changes in social mood is inappropriate for understanding the genesis of financial market action.

     
  • [Article] The Human Social Experience

    [Article] The Human Social Experience

    This essay by Robert R. Prechter, Jr. originally appeared in: The Colours of Infinity. Clarke, Arthur C., et al (2004).  UK: Clearpress, pp. 128-139 View PDF   R.N. Elliott’s Discovery In the 1930s, Ralph Nelson Elliott discovered that aggregate stock market prices trend and reverse in recognizable patterns. In a […]

     
  • [Article] Saddam Hussein’s Capture

    [Article] Saddam Hussein’s Capture

    So in the face of abundant evidence to the contrary, why does the media (and much of Wall Street) still embrace the myth that news moves markets?

     
  • [Article] Challenging the Conventional Assumption About the Presumed Sociological Effect of Terrorist News

    [Article] Challenging the Conventional Assumption About the Presumed Sociological Effect of Terrorist News

    There is probably not one person in a million who would disagree with the conventional view, espoused everywhere, that the attacks of September 11, 2001 and the subsequent deliverance of anthrax-laced letters to individuals shattered the confidence of Americans. Yet that conclusion flies in the face of the facts.