Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

Politics

  • [Article] Authoritarianism Versus Anti-authoritarianism: The Tension Boils Over As  Negative Mood Deepens

    [Article] Authoritarianism Versus Anti-authoritarianism: The Tension Boils Over As Negative Mood Deepens

    Socionomics posits that waves of social mood motivate the rise of authoritarian governments, and that the current wave could put a new group of dictators into office. Part 1 of this study shows that over the past 300 years, the world’s most notorious authoritarians rose to power or committed their worst atrocities during or soon after bear markets. He also clarifies shifts in what’s considered socially, politically and morally normal and why it’s important to know about these changing trends today. Part 2 explains the grassroots sources of authoritarian desire and forecasts ways in which it will most likely manifest itself in the future.

     
  • [Article] During Negative Mood Periods, Society Redefines What’s “Normal”

    [Article] During Negative Mood Periods, Society Redefines What’s “Normal”

    We forecast that a continuing long-term trend toward negative social mood will produce increasingly authoritarian—and anti-authoritarian—impulses and eventually lead to the appearance of severe authoritarian regimes around the globe.

     
  • U.S. Secessionist Sentiment is on the Rise – Will your State Revolt?

    U.S. Secessionist Sentiment is on the Rise – Will your State Revolt?

    Secession isn’t relegated to the history book; it’s a powerful modern political force and springs from the bear-market impulse to polarize and separate. Declines in social mood chip away at the foundations of authority, eventually pushing citizens to attack their own government. In this report, Alan Hall compiles the first-ever index of U.S. secessionism movements to show how, when and why a people revolt.

     
  • [Article] The Developing European Tinderbox: The EU Appears Set to Go Up in Flames

    [Article] The Developing European Tinderbox: The EU Appears Set to Go Up in Flames

    Brian Whitmer, editor of Elliott Wave International’s European Financial Forecast, teams up with The Socionomist to deliver an arresting account of the social climate in Europe and shows how negative social mood is driving apart the economies and politics of the European Union. His analysis shows compelling socionomic parallels between early America and modern Europe, warning of the largest threat to European solidarity since World War II.

     
  • [Article] Congress Gets Angry During Social Mood Declines

    [Article] Congress Gets Angry During Social Mood Declines

    The coming trend of negative social psychology will be characterized primarily by polarization between and among various perceived groups, whether political, ideological, religious, geographical, racial or economic.

     
  • [Article] The Coming Collapse of the Marijuana Prohibition

    [Article] The Coming Collapse of the Marijuana Prohibition

    History shows that mood governs society’s tolerance for recreational drugs. A rising social mood produces prohibition of substances such as alcohol and marijuana; a falling mood produces tolerance and relaxed regulation. In the case of alcohol, the path from prohibition to decriminalization became littered with corruption and violence as the government waged a failed war on traffickers. Eventually, as mood continued to sour, the government finally capitulated to public cries for decriminalization as a means to end the corruption and bloodshed.

     
  • [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    Negative social mood increases stress and disrupts routines, sanitation, households, social relationships, and, ultimately, human immunity.

     
  • [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    It’s widely believed that epidemics make people fearful, but as you will see in this report, socionomic causality better explains the data, which show that fearful people are more susceptible to epidemics.

     
  • [Article] Have We Seen The Peak In Radical Islam?

    [Article] Have We Seen The Peak In Radical Islam?

    In early March, Newsweek’s cover proclaimed, “Radical Islam Is a Fact of Life. How to Live With It.” Socionomist Mark Galasiewski believes that the headline probably marks the multi-year peak in Islamic extremism.

     
  • [Article] A Socionomic Study of Epidemic Disease

    [Article] A Socionomic Study of Epidemic Disease

    Alan Hall’s two-part in-depth study, “A Socionomic Study of Epidemic Disease,” shows how negative social mood establishes conditions precipitating outbreaks of epidemic diseases. Part 1 explores a 600-year history of diseases in bear markets and how society becomes vulnerable. Part 2 focuses on the psychological and physiological mechanisms by which negative social mood compromises human immunity, charts illustrating the timing and similarity of epidemics to financial manias and more potential threats on the horizon.