Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

Cultural Trends

  • [Article] Procreation: The Lowest Rate in a Century

    [Article] Procreation: The Lowest Rate in a Century

    Social mood regulates parents’ optimism about the future and, in turn, whether they should have a baby: “When aggregate feelings of friskiness, daring and confidence wax, people engage in more sexual activity with the aim of having children. When these feelings wane, so does the desire for generating offspring.”

     
  • [Article] The U.S. Midterm Elections: Mixed Mood Delivers Mixed Results

    [Article] The U.S. Midterm Elections: Mixed Mood Delivers Mixed Results

    The U.S. elections generated multiple results expected from a partway-down mood. A “throw-the-rascals-out” theme prevailed in the U.S. House of Representatives as the Republican party decisively—even historically—defeated the Democratic House majority. In addition, voters in California narrowly rejected a referendum to legalize recreational marijuana use; who would have anticipated such a referendum just a few years ago?

     
  • [Article] Electronic Freedom: Checking the Internet’s Vital Signs

    [Article] Electronic Freedom: Checking the Internet’s Vital Signs

    In a period of negative mood, many governments will pull the plug on large swaths of the Internet. In the U.S., the landscape is rapidly changing to make such action possible.

     
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    [Article] From Felix to Mickey, Cartoon Styles Shift Dramatically with Social Mood

    Euan Wilson walks you through animation’s first 40 years step-by-step and shows you how trends in cartoons are actually reflections of waxing and waning social mood throughout the period. This in-depth study will not only alter the way you understand cartoons, it will revolutionize the way you look at popular media.

     
  • [Article] The War Over Drugs: Is There Any End In Sight?

    [Article] The War Over Drugs: Is There Any End In Sight?

    “The Coming Collapse” compared drug-related violence in Mexico to Chicago’s gang wars of the 1930s. Wilson predicted a dramatic escalation in bloodshed and, eventually, cries for legalization to end the killing, just as happened with the earlier prohibition.

     
  • [Article] Social Mood Regulates the Popularity of Stars: The Beatles

    [Article] Social Mood Regulates the Popularity of Stars: The Beatles

    In this exhaustive report from Robert Prechter, you will discover that social mood drives not only market movement, but also the fame, fortune and fallout of the most iconic band in history.

     
  • [Article] Military and Political Leaders Need a Socionomic Perspective

    [Article] Military and Political Leaders Need a Socionomic Perspective

    Guest contributor Michael Flagg asserts that even the best military and political analysts tend to commit a cardinal sin of forecasting. In this discussion, Michael explores the errors of conventional analysis and explains how socionomics gives a better context for understanding geopolitical and corporate conflict.

     
  • [Article] Socionomics in a Snap

    [Article] Socionomics in a Snap

    Read an in-depth interview with Robert R. Prechter, Jr., founder of the Socionomics Institute. “I always feel that it’s taking too long for people to discover socionomics. But when I review the latest developments, I realize that progress is coming along nicely.”

     
  • [Article] Socionomics Can Benefit Sociology: Baby Names

    [Article] Socionomics Can Benefit Sociology: Baby Names

    What motivates how parents name their children? Seven sociologists attacked this question in three different studies, without a consistent answer between them. Socionomics has an answer, linking name popularity to epidemics and the NASDAQ Composite Index.

     
  • [Article] Sports Scandals Signify A Shifting Mood

    [Article] Sports Scandals Signify A Shifting Mood

    Not only are the perception of politicians susceptible to the fluctuations in social mood, sport stars are no different. Former sports journalist Gary Grimes peels back the lid on popular athletes’ such as Tiger Woods and others to reveal their socionomic significance.