Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

The Socionomist

  • [Article] Sports Scandals Signify A Shifting Mood

    [Article] Sports Scandals Signify A Shifting Mood

    Not only are the perception of politicians susceptible to the fluctuations in social mood, sport stars are no different. Former sports journalist Gary Grimes peels back the lid on popular athletes’ such as Tiger Woods and others to reveal their socionomic significance.

     
  • [Article] The Developing European Tinderbox: The EU Appears Set to Go Up in Flames

    [Article] The Developing European Tinderbox: The EU Appears Set to Go Up in Flames

    Brian Whitmer, editor of Elliott Wave International’s European Financial Forecast, teams up with The Socionomist to deliver an arresting account of the social climate in Europe and shows how negative social mood is driving apart the economies and politics of the European Union. His analysis shows compelling socionomic parallels between early America and modern Europe, warning of the largest threat to European solidarity since World War II.

     
  • [Article] Will You Make the Cut? Pro-Eugenics Ideas May Resurface As Negative Mood Deepens

    [Article] Will You Make the Cut? Pro-Eugenics Ideas May Resurface As Negative Mood Deepens

    Alan Hall reveals how the large mood fluctuations shaped the eugenics movement in America and abroad and how it not only changes people’s valuation of financial and other assets — it changes how humans value others. Hall puts the pieces of the puzzle together and makes a startling forecast for a resurging ideology most believe to be dead.

     
  • [Article] Congress Gets Angry During Social Mood Declines

    [Article] Congress Gets Angry During Social Mood Declines

    The coming trend of negative social psychology will be characterized primarily by polarization between and among various perceived groups, whether political, ideological, religious, geographical, racial or economic.

     
  • [Article] Craving Dark TV Shows This Season? How Social Mood Affects Programming

    [Article] Craving Dark TV Shows This Season? How Social Mood Affects Programming

    Television heralded a new era in popular media so it’s no surprise that popular television shows reflect the social mood of the times. For an example, Euan Wilson d how TV networks can benefit from socionomics by graphing the audience sizes between Showtime and HBO during a bear market and by the types of the shows presented.

     
  • [Article] The Fallacies of Trend Extrapolation and Reliance Upon Exogenous Causality

    [Article] The Fallacies of Trend Extrapolation and Reliance Upon Exogenous Causality

    Socionomics states that the stock market is not like physics. This essay reasserts the common problems economists and futurists experience in forecasting social and macroeconomic trends and the role of optimism in the economy.

     
  • "Smart" Car

    [Article] Social Mood Governs Speed Limits, Auto Design, and Traffic Fatality Levels

    Euan Wilson takes the wheel and drives right to the heart of how social mood affects trends in auto design, driving habits, and even your safety on the road in this issue of the Socionomist.

     
  • [Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience

    [Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience

    This multi-decade study sketches a broad guide for anticipating phases in wealth-related social action. Robert Prechter and Alan Hall team up to discuss how four cyclical phases of social psychology influence attitudes on tax rates, financial regulation, relative financial wages, credit market debt, and wealth inequality.

     
  • gun shooting bullet, 9 mm

    [Article] Murder and the Market

    Along with reintroduction of Robert Prechter’s socionomic theory of how society creates serial killers and when they are most likely to strike, contributing writer, Professor Ken Olson, disentangles the relationship between murder rates and the stock market.

     
  • [Article] The Coming Collapse of the Marijuana Prohibition

    [Article] The Coming Collapse of the Marijuana Prohibition

    History shows that mood governs society’s tolerance for recreational drugs. A rising social mood produces prohibition of substances such as alcohol and marijuana; a falling mood produces tolerance and relaxed regulation. In the case of alcohol, the path from prohibition to decriminalization became littered with corruption and violence as the government waged a failed war on traffickers. Eventually, as mood continued to sour, the government finally capitulated to public cries for decriminalization as a means to end the corruption and bloodshed.