Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

The Socionomist

  • [Article] Craving Dark TV Shows This Season? How Social Mood Affects Programming

    [Article] Craving Dark TV Shows This Season? How Social Mood Affects Programming

    Television heralded a new era in popular media so it’s no surprise that popular television shows reflect the social mood of the times. For an example, Euan Wilson d how TV networks can benefit from socionomics by graphing the audience sizes between Showtime and HBO during a bear market and by the types of the shows presented.

     
  • [Article] The Fallacies of Trend Extrapolation and Reliance Upon Exogenous Causality

    [Article] The Fallacies of Trend Extrapolation and Reliance Upon Exogenous Causality

    Socionomics states that the stock market is not like physics. This essay reasserts the common problems economists and futurists experience in forecasting social and macroeconomic trends and the role of optimism in the economy.

     
  • "Smart" Car

    [Article] Social Mood Governs Speed Limits, Auto Design, and Traffic Fatality Levels

    Euan Wilson takes the wheel and drives right to the heart of how social mood affects trends in auto design, driving habits, and even your safety on the road in this issue of the Socionomist.

     
  • [Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience

    [Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience

    This multi-decade study sketches a broad guide for anticipating phases in wealth-related social action. Robert Prechter and Alan Hall team up to discuss how four cyclical phases of social psychology influence attitudes on tax rates, financial regulation, relative financial wages, credit market debt, and wealth inequality.

     
  • gun shooting bullet, 9 mm

    [Article] Murder and the Market

    Along with reintroduction of Robert Prechter’s socionomic theory of how society creates serial killers and when they are most likely to strike, contributing writer, Professor Ken Olson, disentangles the relationship between murder rates and the stock market.

     
  • [Article] The Coming Collapse of the Marijuana Prohibition

    [Article] The Coming Collapse of the Marijuana Prohibition

    History shows that mood governs society’s tolerance for recreational drugs. A rising social mood produces prohibition of substances such as alcohol and marijuana; a falling mood produces tolerance and relaxed regulation. In the case of alcohol, the path from prohibition to decriminalization became littered with corruption and violence as the government waged a failed war on traffickers. Eventually, as mood continued to sour, the government finally capitulated to public cries for decriminalization as a means to end the corruption and bloodshed.

     
  • [Article] A Browner Shade Of Green

    [Article] A Browner Shade Of Green

    From its July 2008 all-time-high, the Continuous Commodity Index fell 47 percent and remains about 32 percent below its peak. The following timeline of headlines documents the subsequent environmental accidents and waning desire to save the environment:

     
  • [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    Negative social mood increases stress and disrupts routines, sanitation, households, social relationships, and, ultimately, human immunity.

     
  • [Article] Sky High Construction? Not in Saudi Arabia or Dubai

    [Article] Sky High Construction? Not in Saudi Arabia or Dubai

    Commonly referred to as the Skyscraper Indicator, this study examines why impressive construction projects tend to start right after major peaks in social mood.

     
  • [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    [Article] A Socionomic View of Epidemic Disease

    It’s widely believed that epidemics make people fearful, but as you will see in this report, socionomic causality better explains the data, which show that fearful people are more susceptible to epidemics.