Social Mood Conference  |  Socionomics Foundation

By Alan Hall | Excerpted from the July 2017 Socionomist


 

In his book The Wave Principle of Human Social Behavior, Robert Prechter said that the social images of public figures are a matter of timing with social mood. So, regardless of the facts, the career of an upstanding or talented public figure may be ravaged during a negative trend, while an incompetent or corrupt public figure may be protected by positive mood. Prechter explained that when mood is overwhelmingly positive, people express ecstasy, and one way they do it is to revere public figures. Will positive social mood be enough to save Donald Trump from impeachment/removal from office? Alan Hall explores that question in the July 2017 issue of The Socionomist. Following are excerpts from his article.

President Trump finds his administration embroiled in controversy and investigation. Two members of Congress have drafted articles of impeachment. History suggests that social mood will influence the outcome of this chapter in American history. …

The July 2013 issue said, “Politicians steer their careers only partially. Often, a more important driver is social mood. Changes in social mood can propel public figures from acclaim to ignominy, and vice-versa, from abhorrence to adoration.” …

Impeachment is a legal process, so investigation and facts play a role, but feelings and mood can shape the result. The process has several steps. First, simple majorities in two committees—first the House Committee on Rules and then the House Committee on the Judiciary—must vote to resolve that grounds for impeachment exist. The Judiciary Committee then sends an Impeachment Resolution to the full House. If a simple majority in the House votes in favor of at least one article of impeachment, the matter goes to the Senate for a trial. If at least two-thirds of the senators find the president guilty, he is removed from office. …

The House has voted to impeach a president twice in U.S. history. Social mood was trending positively in both cases, and in both cases the Senate voted for acquittal. Let’s review these instances, along with a near-impeachment whose outcome is instructive. …


 

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